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Fourth Grade

  • Fourth Grade Classroom Goals:

    By the end of the school year, 100% of the students will meet or exceed the state standards in reading, as measured by district benchmark tests and the STAAR test.

    By the end of the school year, 100% of the students will meet or exceed the grade level math standards, as measured by district benchmark tests and the STAAR test.

    Click here to link to the Fourth Grade Texas Essential Knowledge & Skills (TEKS).

    Learning Standards in Fourth Grade

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & READING

    LISTENING/SPEAKING. Students:

    • listen to gain information and supporting evidence;

    • monitor their understanding of a spoken message and appropriately seek clarification;

    • interpret speaker’s messages (both verbal and nonverbal), purposes and perspectives; and

    • monitor their own understanding of the spoken message and seek clarification as needed.

    READING. Students:

    • read and comprehend a variety of fourth-grade level texts;

    • adjust reading rate according to the purpose for reading;

    • monitor their own comprehension and reread, use reference aids, search for clues, and ask questions when understanding breaks down;

    • use multiple reference aids, including software, to clarify and seek information;

    • study word meanings across content areas and through current events;

    • respond to readings and ideas through journal writing, discussion, and media;

    • paraphrase and summarize text;

    • represent text information by generating outlines, timelines, and graphics; and

    • offer observations, make connections, react, speculate, interpret, and raise questions after reading.

    WRITING. Students:

    • capitalize, use punctuation, and spell correctly in “published” pieces of writing;

    • evaluate written compositions using assigned and established criteria;

    • conduct research and raise new questions for further investigation;

    • write to express, discover, record, develop, reflect on ideas, and problem solve; and

    • compose journals, letters, reviews, poems, narratives, and instructions.

    VIEWING/REPRESENTING. Students:

    • understand and interpret visual messages and media;

    • analyze and critique media; and

    • produce visual images, messages, and meanings that communicate effectively.

    SOCIAL STUDIES

    HISTORY. Students:

    • compare similarities and differences of Native American groups in Texas and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration;

    • explain causes and effects of European exploration and colonization of Texas and the Western Hemisphere;

    • explain causes and effects of the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States;

    • describe political, economic, and social changes in Texas during the last half of the 19th century; and

    • describe important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in Texas.

    GEOGRAPHY. Students:

    • use geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data;

    • describe political, economic, and physical regions in Texas and the Western Hemisphere;

    • explain the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live in Texas; and

    • describe how people in Texas adapt to and modify their environment.

    ECONOMICS. Students:

    • explain basic patterns of work and economic activities of early societies in Texas;

    • describe the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in Texas; and

    • identify how Texas, the United States, and the world are economically interdependent.

    GOVERNMENT. Students:

    • compare how people organized governments in different ways during the early development of Texas;

    • identify important ideas in historic documents, such as the Texas Declaration of Independence; and

    • explain the basic functions of the three branches of state government.

    CITIZENSHIP. Students:

    • explain important customs, symbols, and celebrations of Texas;

    • explain the role of the individual in state and local elections; and

    • identify leaders in state and local government and tell how to contact them.

    CULTURE. Students:

    • identify the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas.

    SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY. Students:

    • describe the impact of science and technology on life in Texas.

    SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS. Students:

    • apply critical-thinking skills, communicate effectively, and use problem-solving and decision-making processes.

    MATHEMATICS

    NUMBER, OPERATION, AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING. Students:

    • read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through millions;

    • read, write, compare, and order decimals through hundredths;

    • model fractions greater than one;

    • generate equivalent fractions using models;

    • compare and order fractions using concrete and picture models;

    • relate fractions and decimals for tenths and hundredths;

    • add and subtract whole numbers and decimals to hundredths;

    • model factors and products;

    • represent multiplication and division;

    • recall and apply multiplication facts;

    • multiply with two-digit multipliers;

    • divide with a one-digit divisor;

    • use addition and subtraction to solve problems;

    • round to ten, hundred, or thousand; and

    • estimate products and quotients.

    PATTERNS, RELATIONSHIPS, AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING. Students:

    • use patterns to remember multiplication facts;

    • solve division problems using fact families;

    • use patterns to multiply by 10 and 100; and

    • describe the relationship between two sets of data.

    GEOMETRY AND SPATIAL REASONING. Students:

    • use formal language for angles;

    • identify parallel and perpendicular lines;

    • describe shapes and solids with vertices, edges, and faces;

    • demonstrate translations, reflections, and rotations;

    • verify congruence and symmetry; and

    • locate and name whole numbers, fractions, and decimals on number line.

    MEASUREMENT. Students:

    • estimate and measure weight and capacity; and

    • measure length, perimeter, time, temperature, and area.

    PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS. Students:

    • interpret bar graphs;

    • list possible outcomes of a probability experiment; and

    • use a pair of numbers to describe the probability of an event.

    PROBLEM SOLVING. Students:

    • identify the mathematics in everyday situations;

    • use a problem-solving model;

    • select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy;

    • explain and record observations;

    • relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols; and

    • make generalizations from patterns.

    SCIENCE

    FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. Students:

    • demonstrate safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices; and

    • learn to use and conserve, dispose and recycle resources.

    SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY. Students:

    • plan and implement descriptive and simple investigations, ask well-defined questions, formulate hypotheses, select and use appropriate equipment and technology, collect, analyze and interpret information, observe and measure, and communicate valid conclusions; and

    • construct graphs, tables, maps, charts to organize, examine, and evaluate information.

    CRITICAL THINKING, PROBLEM SOLVING, AND DECISION MAKING SKILLS. Students:

    • analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations/hypotheses/ theories, including strengths and weaknesses, and draw inferences on promotional materials for products and services;

    • evaluate research on scientific thought, society, and the environment; and

    • connect science concepts with history of science and contributions of scientists.

    TOOLS AND MODELS. Students:

    • collect information, measure, and compare using tools, including safety goggles, microscopes, sound recorders, computers, hand lenses, thermometers, meter sticks, balances, and compasses;

    • represent the natural world using models and analyze their limitations; and

    • demonstrate that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results.

    SYSTEMS, CYCLES, PATTERNS, AND CHANGE. Students:

    • identify and describe roles of organisms in living systems and parts in non-living objects and predict and draw conclusions when part of a system is removed; and

    • identify patterns of change and use reflection to verify symmetry.

    MATTER AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES. Students:

    • observe and record changes in states of matter caused by heat and conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter-states, conduction, density, and buoyancy.

    ADAPTATIONS. Students:

    • identify characteristics that allow survival and reproduction of species;

    • compare adaptive characteristics of species and identify and compare species that lived in the past to existing species; and

    • distinguish inherited and learned characteristics providing examples.

    PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE EVENTS. Students:

    • identify and observe effects of events that require time for change to become noticeable.

    PROCESSES OF THE NATURAL WORLD. Students:

    • test properties of soils, effects of oceans on land, and the Sun as our major source of energy.

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