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First Grade

  • First Grade Classroom Goal:  100% of Ms. _______________’s class will read at or above grade level by the end of the year as measured by the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) level 16 or higher. 

    Click here to link to the First Grade Texas Essential Knowledge & Skills (TEKS).

     

    Learning Standards for First Grade

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & READING

    LISTENING/SPEAKING. Students:

    • listen to gather information, solve problems, and enjoy and appreciate literature;

    • present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems, and plays;

    • participate in group discussions; and

    • make announcements, give directions, and make introductions appropriately.

    READING. Students:

    • recognize the conventions of print (e.g., understand that print moves left to right, involves upper and lower case letters, and represents spoken language);

    • manipulate sounds in spoken words (phonemic awareness) and understand that letters represent sounds (phonics);

    • read and comprehend first-grade level text fluently;

    • use graphs, charts, signs, and captions to acquire information;

    • find and connect ideas and themes in different books and other printed resources;

    • draw conclusions from information gathered; and

    • self-select books and stories by drawing on personal interest, relying on knowledge of authors or types of texts.

    WRITING. Students:

    • write their own name and each letter of the alphabet;

    • gain increasing control of penmanship and punctuation;

    • compose questions, ideas, and stories;

    • write for different purposes, such as composing lists, letters, stories, and poems;

    • engage in the writing process by generating ideas before writing and developing and polishing drafts; and

    • record or dictate questions for investigations.

    SOCIAL STUDIES

    HISTORY. Students:

    • identify contributions of people, such as Sam Houston and Thomas Edison;

    • describe the origins of holidays, such as Veterans Day;

    • identify anthems and mottoes of the state and nation; and

    • distinguish among past, present, and future.

    GEOGRAPHY. Students:

    • locate places using cardinal directions;

    • create and use simple maps;

    • locate community, state, and nation on maps and globes;

    • describe physical and human characteristics of places; and

    • identify natural resources and how they are used.

    ECONOMICS. Students:

    • identify examples of goods and services, ways people exchange them, and the role of markets in the exchange;

    • identify reasons for making economic choices; and

    • describe how specialized jobs contribute to production of goods and services.

    GOVERNMENT. Students:

    • explain the need for and give examples of rules and laws; and

    • identify and describe the roles of leaders in the community, state, and nation.

    CITIZENSHIP. Students:

    • identify characteristics of good citizenship and identify historic figures and ordinary people who exemplify good  citizenship;

    • explain patriotic symbols, such as the Liberty Bell; and

    • recite and explain the Pledge of Allegiance and Pledge to the Texas Flag.

    CULTURE. Students:

    • describe ways that families meet basic human needs; and

    • retell stories from folktales and legends.

    SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY. Students:

    • describe how technology has changed how families live and how people work.

    SOCIAL STUDIES SKILLS. Students:

    • sequence and categorize information;

    • identify main ideas;

    • express ideas orally and visually; and

    • use problem-solving and decision-making processes.

    MATHEMATICS

    NUMBER, OPERATION, AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING. Students:

    • compare and order whole numbers up to 99;

    • create sets of tens and ones using concrete objects;

    • describe values of coins and their relationships;

    • read and write numbers to 99;

    • separate a whole into parts and describe the parts of a set;

    • describe the parts of a set of objects;

    • model and write addition and subtraction sentences; and

    • learn and apply addition facts.

    PATTERNS, RELATIONSHIPS, AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING. Students:

    • find patterns such as odd and even;

    • use place value to compare and order whole numbers;

    • identify fact families for addition and subtraction;

    • identify, describe, and extend patterns to solve problems; and

    • skip count by twos, fives, and tens.

    GEOMETRY AND SPATIAL REASONING. Students:

    • sort objects by attributes using informal language;

    • identify shapes and solids; and

    • combine shapes to make a new shape.

    MEASUREMENT. Students:

    • estimate and measure using nonstandard units;

    • relate the unit to size of object;

    • recognize reasonable temperatures;

    • describe time on a clock (hours, half hours); and

    • order events by length of time.

    PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS. Students:

    • collect and sort data;

    • construct graphs (real, picture, and bar);

    • draw conclusions from graphs; and

    • identify events as certain or impossible.

    PROBLEM SOLVING. Students:

    • identify mathematics in everyday situations;

    • use a problem-solving model, with guidance as needed;

    • select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy;

    • use tools to solve problems;

    • explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology;

    • relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols; and

    • reason and support their thinking using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology.

    SCIENCE

    SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS. Students:

    • demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations; and

    • learn how to use and conserve resources.

    SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY AND CRITICAL THINKING. Students:

    • ask questions about organisms, objects, and events;

    • construct reasonable explanations using information;

    • explain a problem in their own words and propose a solution; and

    • use tools, including hand lenses, clocks, computers, thermometers, and balances.

    PROPERTIES, PATTERNS, AND SYSTEMS. Students:

    • identify, predict, and create patterns, including those in charts, graphs, and numbers;

    • know that systems have parts and are composed of organisms and objects;

    • observe and describe the parts of plants and animals; and

    • manipulate objects so that the parts are separated from the whole, which may result in the part or the whole not working.

    CHANGE. Students:

    • measure changes in size, mass, color, position, quantity, sound, and movement;

    • observe and record weather changes from day to day and over seasons; and

    • observe stages in the life cycle of organisms in their natural environment.

    LIVING ORGANISMS AND NON-LIVING OBJECTS. Students:

    • group and compare living organisms and non-living objects.

    BASIC NEEDS OF ORGANISMS. Students:

    • identify characteristics of organisms that allow their basic needs to be met; and

    • compare the ways living organisms depend on each other.

    PROCESSES OF THE NATURAL WORLD. Students:

    • describe natural sources of water, including streams, lakes, and oceans;

    • observe and describe differences in rocks and soil samples; and

    • identify how rocks, soil, and water are used and how they can be recycled.